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  • Nationality: Dutch (previously Ukrainian)
  • Age: 29
  • Field of study: International Business & Management
  • Current employer: Eindhoven University of Technology
  • Current position: Finance Administrator

Why I started my career in the Netherlands 
After graduating from the Dutch university, I decided to try my luck in finding a job in The Netherlands. It was a pure interest of mine to see how hard it was to find a job for a foreigner in this country without speaking Dutch. The most interesting part about it was that it was the year 2012 - not the best year for the Dutch labour market after the crisis. I like challenges and back then I have decided to take on one and I have succeeded.  

A typical work week 
“Never a dull moment” - the best description of my work week. The majority of my time is spent behind a computer preparing different statements and reports. A relative small amount of time is spent on different meetings, gatherings and brainstorming sessions. Due to the nature of my work, I encounter significant amounts of technical problems that have to be solved in time as well as communicated to the final receiver of a product.

Cool projects 

At my previous work, I had a chance to work as a project administrator for an international project that was conducted in Saudi Arabia. My former employer - an engineering & consulting company - was responsible for constructing and building some major roads and highways in the cities of Riyadh and Jeddah. Personally for me it was a great opportunity to see the financial side of such a huge projectand be constantly involved in interesting discussions and meetings about investments, challenges and even losses and how to tackle problems.

What I like about the Dutch work mentality 

No matter how relaxed Dutch work mentality might be (the so-called 9 to 5 mentality), it always amazes me how efficient Dutch people use this time to finish things up.  

My career advice to you
- Never give up! No matter how easy it sounds, perseverance is the key to success in a foreign country
- Know your unique selling point (USP). The more you are aware of your strengths the more chances you have to excel during the interview;
- Network as much as possible and make sure people remember you (in a positive way of course).

Want to connect?!
LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/digtiarova if you would like to contact me, please include a personal message about yourself
Skype: iryna602